How Much Does It Cost To Hire a Lawyer To Sue My Employer?

Employment attorneys generally charge anywhere from $200 to $650 per hour, depending on their years of experience, level of expertise, and issue. However, most employment lawyers work on a contingent fee – meaning a client pays a contingent fee to a lawyer only if the lawyer handles a case successfully.

By Brad Nakase, Attorney

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Most employment attorneys hourly rate will depend on the location, experience of the attorney, and reasons for suing your employer. Many employment attorneys charge an hourly rate for handling employment cases if their client is the employer. The average cost for a lawyer to sue an employer cost $200 to $650 per hour. A contingent fee arrangement is best for workers who want to sue their employers but cannot afford to pay a lawyer by the hour.

In this article, our employment attorney for workers will explain the average cost of a lawsuit, the fees that may be involved, and who is expected to pay these fees.


Our office charges $0 upfront, and there is no fee unless you win!


Here are some of the common lawyer’s fees you may expect:

  • Contingency fees – If you hire your lawyer on a contingency fee basis, you will only pay them if they win the case. Payment will usually be as a percentage of the money recovered, usually 35% to $45%. This is a great option if you do not have the money to pay your lawyer on an ongoing basis. Our lawyer to sue employer work on a a contingency basis, $0 upfront, and no fee unless we collect money for you.
  • Hourly fees – Attorney’s fees can vary significantly, but expect at least $200 per hour for an attorney. It is usually best to pay per hour if you need them for a specific service, otherwise, it can add up quickly! Our law office represents employee’s lawsuit on a contingency basis, $0 upfront, and no fee unless we collect money for you.

Before hiring a lawyer to sue your employer, it is important to discuss fees and the ongoing legal costs before you hire your employment lawyer.

  • If you file your employment discrimination case with the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, you will not be charged for filing the lawsuit. The EEOC will try to mediate with your employer to reach a satisfactory solution. If this mediation fails, the EEOC will then file a federal lawsuit. In some cases, they are unable to file a lawsuit and will notify you in writing and give you 90 days to file your own lawsuit.

  • If you have a strong case, an employment attorney to sue employer may accept your case on a contingency basis. It will be unlikely that your attorney will lose the case and therefore earn nothing. When they swin, they will receive a percentage of the settlement or judgement, usually between 20 and 50%. Lawyers with a successful track record for large settlements might charge a higher percentage than other attorneys. If the case settles and doesn’t go to court, your attorney might take a lower percentage of your settlement.

  • If the case goes to court, fees for expert witnesses, court fees, and other expenses will be deducted from your settlement. These will generally be around $10,000, but your employment lawyer to sue employer will be able to give you a more accurate estimate based on your case. Attorneys may also handle your case on a partial-contingency fee basis and expect you to pay these costs whether you win or lose your case.

  • Some employment attorneys handle employment discrimination cases on an hourly basis because they can be difficult to prove. Depending on the attorney’s hourly rate, it may be between $100 -$600 per hour. Court costs and other expenses will be charged on top of this. Hourly legal fees can add up quickly, especially for complex cases that need a lot of legal work from a lawyer to sue employer.

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