Corporate Law Articles

Discover and learn the latest valuable corporate law articles for ideas, practical information, and DIY from a network of leading business and corporate lawyers.

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What is a breach of fiduciary duties?

A fiduciary is a professional person who owes a legal and ethical responsibility to another person. Examples of people with fiduciary duties are lawyers, financial advisors, corporate officers, corporate directors, etc. A breach of fiduciary duty occurs when the professional person fails to do what was legally and ethically required of them.

Why Choose S Corp vs. C Corp: Advantages & Disadvantages

S Corps and C Corps have one main difference: taxes. A C corporation pays tax on its income. An owner of a C Corp will also pay tax on the income he or she receives as owner. By contrast, an S Corporation does not pay tax.

5 Easy Steps: How to Dissolve a Corporation in California

When a business owner wishes to close, or dissolve, their business, he or she must file a certificate of dissolution with the Secretary of State. This certificate of dissolution lets the Secretary of State know that the business owner is terminating his or her California corporation, effectively closing it for good. Dissolution is a process that involves a number of steps.

How to Form a Corporation in California

If forming a corporation in California is the right next move for your business, then the following steps will help you understand how to form a corporation in California.

15 Steps: Starting an Inc in California

For the business owner, there are many benefits to creating a corporation in California. Assuming it is properly run, a corporation has the ability to shield its shareholders from debts and liabilities on the business side of matters.

11 Steps on How to Start a Corporation

A corporation is a separate legal entity which can protect its owners from business liabilities and risks. There are many benefits to starting a corporation. A business owner can save money on taxes, protect his or her own assets, attract the interest of investors, or simply enhance one’s credibility among consumers and vendors.

6 Steps: How to Become Incorporated

When a business is incorporated, this means that it is becoming an entity that is legally separate from its founders. Like a person, a corporation can own property, sign contracts, be sold, and even live on after a founder leaves or passes away.

5 Benefits: What Does it Mean to Incorporate a Business

For background, in order to incorporate a business, a founder must file paperwork with the state in which their business is located. There can either be a single shareholder or multiple involved in the incorporation process. Importantly, an incorporated business is legally a separate entity from its shareholders.

10 Must Know: Corporation vs. Incorporation

Inc. and Corp. are abbreviations that mean the same thing. Inc. means incorporated, while Corp. means corporation. When a corporation chooses its name, it can decide between adding either one of these suffixes to its name.

7 Differences Between Inc and Corp

Inc. is the abbreviation for incorporation, while Corp. is the abbreviation for corporation. Both of these abbreviations are used by entities that have been incorporated.

13 Steps Incorporation Process

Incorporation is the process a business owner must follow to turn his or her company into a corporation or a limited liability company (LLC). Incorporating a business turns it into its own legal entity with similar rights and duties as a person.

3 Steps on How to Get a Certificate of Status in California

Anyone who owns a business in California and would like to transfer his or her business to another state will need to get a Certificate of Status. This may also be known as a Certificate of Good Standing or Certificate of Existence.

Sarbanes-Oxley Act Summary

Sarbanes-Oxley Act, designed to address a fraud and transparency on company shareholders that arose from corporate insider’ conflict of interest.
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