Behavioral Indicators of Child Molesters

Brad Nakase, Attorney


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Attention:

Some of the people who have already sexually abused a child or plan to do not show any observable behavior pattern that could provide a clue to their future course of action.

 

Child Sexual Abusers:

  1. Are often aware of their fondness for children before reaching 18 years of age.
  2. Are, in vast majority of cases, adult males. Though some women also sexually abuse children.
  3. Are mostly married. However, a small percentage of them who never marry would maintain their whole life an emotional and sexual interest in children.
  4. May feel more at ease with children, be more comfortable with their interests and relate better to them than adults.
  5. (Consequently, they) may have few close friends who are adult.
  6. Usually have more interest in a specific age
  7. Mostly prefer one gender (girls or boys) over the other, but some are bisexual.
  8. May seek volunteer opportunities and jobs with programs concerning children of their preferred age or sex group.
  9. Pursue kids or teens for sexual and emotional purposes. They may feel emotionally attached to children to the extent that their emotional needs are fulfilled primarily by engaging in relationships with children. (An adult man, for example, spends time with children of neighbors or relatives and loves to tell them about his fondness for them or about his feelings of loneliness and loss so as to get the child’s sympathy).
  10. Often he takes pictures or collects photographs of victim children dressed, nude or engaged in sexual acts.
  11. May collect child-adult pornography and child erotica to use in the following ways:
  • To lower victims’ inhibitions.
  • To fantasize at times when there is no victim available.
  • To relive their past sexual encounters
  • To justify his or her illegitimate sexual encounters
  • To blackmail victim children to ensure their silence.
  1. May possess drugs or alcohol and give them to victims to gain favor or lower their inhibitions.
  2. May converse with children in ways that they feel themselves equal to the adult predator.
  3. May speak about children like someone would talk about an adult lover.
  4. May be a member of organizations that support his/her sexual beliefs.
  5. May offer to take care of children or take them on trips to get a chance to get physically close to them.
  6. May be frequently seen at children parks and playgrounds.



What to Do If You Catch A Molester?

Sexual abuse is a serious crime. If you believe someone has molested your child or any other child, do not try to handle it yourself! When caught, a predator will always say that it was their “first time” and he will also promise never to do it again. But he will be lying and he is good at it. Call the police and report abuse! The best thing one could for one’s own child and for the other children (past or potential victims of the predator) is to report the crime to the authorities. If a molester has preyed on your child, he will do it to others too unless he’s stop stopped.

Absolutely confidential and Free consultation with a lawyer

Contact the Nakase Law Firm today at (619) 550-1321 to speak with a sexual abuse lawyer based in San Diego or Orange County.

**We do not represent such persons as are convicted or accused of sexual harassment.

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